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May 15, 2017

Less is more: Researchers develop a ‘molecule needle’ using a simplified biological system

Minimalism is an increasingly popular lifestyle choice that encourages individuals to decrease the overall number of possessions owned and live more simply. According to minimalist philosophy, the reduction of unnecessary clutter enables one to live a more functional and purposeful existence. IMP-IMBA Group Leader and CSSB scientist Thomas Marlovits*, in collaboration with colleagues from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), discovered that a minimalist approach can also be applied to complex biological systems, such as the type III secretion system. The findings of this collaborative study have been published in the scientific journal, Nature Communications.

May 10, 2017

Connecting brain regions in a dish – A new organoid technology to detect malfunctions in the brain

Scientists at IMBA (Institute of Molecular Biotechnology) describe novel organoid technology combining various brain regions for investigation of epilepsy, and other neurological diseases, as reported in the current issue of Nature Methods.

April 25, 2017

Josef Penninger receives CEE Innovation Award

Vienna, April 25th 2017 For his extraordinary scientific achievements and his international pioneering role in genetics and cancer research Josef Penninger, Scientific Director of IMBA (Austrian Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) was awarded the second CEE Innovation Award.

April 11, 2017

Tuberculosis: Researchers Uncover how Bacteria Burst our Cells

Scientists based in Vienna unveil the complex molecular structure that causes lethal infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Their findings might have implications for potential therapies against antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis.

April 06, 2017

Researchers initiate cross-disciplinary bioethics symposium at IMBA

Inquisitiveness, academic freedom, and a pioneer spirit are what drive many scientists to answer previously unsolved questions, collect new findings, and sometimes even open up completely new fields of research. These fields include the first human brain organoid and the CRISPR/Cas9 “gene shears”, both developed in Vienna. Each has enormous potential for modern medicine. But biotechnological innovations lead to any number of questions and pose new challenges for our society.

The Vienna Biocenter in the third district of Vienna has established itself as the premier location for life sciences in Central Europe and is a world-leading international bio-medical research center.

 

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